links I like.

The complete guide to structuring your ideal work day. Really good advice here.

Use video on your website? This tool redesigns the interface to match your site’s design. Use it. The Youtube interface isn’t pretty.

Considering cloud storage? Dropbox and OneDrive compared.

Already using Dropbox? Use selective sync to save space on your hard drive.

Use this extension to annotate attachments right in Gmail. Without downloading.

Remember the mix tape? Go here and make one. Listen to it. Share. Guaranteed to improve your mood.

In the market for a new laptop? Check out this interactive shopping guide “map.”

Need to learn a new skill or develop a habit? Try the pomodoro technique using Persevy.

And if you don’t know what the pomodoro technique is (or why you should care), then go here.

If you don’t like networking, you may be doing it wrong. The goal? Make friends, not simply contacts.

Links I like is a semi-regular Friday feature on Inspired Law Blog, and like all other posts, is written by Caitlin (Cat) Moon, a consultant and coach to lawyers and other driven people who want to design inspired ways to work.

go learn something. #actionmonday

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What are you doing today to learn something new?

What can you do every day to learn something new?

And I’m not talking about mandatory continuing education. Although it would be great if folks held CLE courses to a high standard and didn’t just phone it in. But I recognize that is a problem too big for me to fix.

I suggest that making learning a part of your daily routine — a habit, dare I say — can do as much, if not more, than any single other thing you can do to grow. As a lawyer, a person, a professional, a friend, a spouse, a parent. No matter the role, you will be better.

It’s one of my three big goals: learn something new. Every day.

It’s not hard. And only takes as much time as you want it to.

Here’s how.

READ. Find something to read that interests you. Blogs, books, magazines, research papers (which can actually be quite fascinating).

TALK. Find people to talk to. People who do things you’re interested in or want to know more about. This can lead to networking but it’s really more focused on learning new stuff. Though it’s interesting how connecting with new and different people can open up new and different opportunities.

TAKE A CLASS. Preferably a workshop. That’s hands-on. Yes, there are some good CLE courses out there, but most are not great. And anyway, this is an investment in your learning, not in getting mandatory CE credit. Explore your interests, hobbies, passions, through a class, either live or online.

GO TO CONFERENCES. Get out there and meet people. Some conferences are very good. Others are not so. Do some research, figure out where the intersection of your interests exists, register, and GO.

LISTEN. Listen to what interesting and smart people have to say. Really listen. Listen to audiobooks, podcasts, NPR during your commute/run/walk.

FIND OR CREATE A GROUP. Gather together some like-minded or even not-so-like-minded folks and meet on a regular basis to explore something or everything. I’ve done this more than once and have always been surprised at how much it added to my learning.

TEACH. The best way to really learn is to study something and then teach it to others. Beyond mastery, teaching is incredibly satisfying on many levels. 

Before your mind goes to all the reasons you can’t adopt the learning mindset, let me say this: As with exercise, diet, meditation, or whatever you do to stay alive and healthy, choosing to make time for learning is a choice. You can choose to make it a prioritized goal. Or not.

What’s not an excuse.

Access? Go online, spend 10 minutes on Google and you’ll have access to more resources on your chosen topic than you can possibly get through in your lifetime. It’s all there. Maybe the seminar you’ve chosen is expensive. So choose another one. Or take a course on Udemy or Skillshare or Coursera or Kahn Academy or edX.

Money? Nope. Again, 10 minutes on Google and most of what you find is free. Courses from the online sources above are free or very low in cost. Books from the library are free. Or join Amazon Prime (cheap, but not free), and check out ebooks.

Time? Well, this one’s on you. You either make time or you don’t. Make it one of your three annual/monthly/weekly/daily goals. Or not.

Why bother?

Lifelong learners are more interesting people than stagnant ones. This is just common sense. Don’t you want to be more interesting? And more interested?

You’re more likely to earn more than non-learners.

You’re more likely to have a healthier, happier, younger brain as you age.

And as Dan Pink shares in Drive, we humans need three things in order to feel motived in and satisfied with our lives: autonomy, mastery, and purpose. Lifelong learning achieves all three.

get moving.

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Want to be a happy, healthy, successful lawyer [or anything else]? Then get moving.

I mean it — literally get moving. Get up, get out, and work out. 

How, when, and how much [to some extent] matter much less than the fact that you’re just doing it.

I’m sharing this because we lawyers need the benefits of exercise as much (if not more than) any group of people I know. Too many of us suffer from depression, stress, anxiety, and other health problems.

But we don’t have to. A powerful antidote is not complicated, expensive, or very time-consuming. It’s EXERCISE.

You likely already know this, but it bears repeating that regular exercise does all of the following and more:

  • relieves stress
  • calms anxiety
  • controls weight [you can eat more!]
  • boosts energy
  • combats many diseases
  • promotes better sleep

In addition to all of this external, scientific proof, I know from personal experience that exercise can be the single most effective way to improve both your mood and your health. It really is that simple.

I guarantee the following: commit to a regular exercise routine — focusing less on the exact exercise or level of effort, and more on simple consistency — and your overall well-being will improve measurably. You will feel better. You will sleep better. You will think more clearly. You will be happier.

In many ways, I am the poster child for this guarantee. When I’m not in a regular exercise routine, I feel different. In a not good way. When I’m in it, everything else in my life is easier. And the exercise itself? It’s not hard. I just have to do it.

Ready to get started? It’s a simple as using an app such as DailyBurn, finding some exercises appropriate for your fitness level and ability, and just doing it.

If you need motivation, get a buddy to hold you accountable.Two years ago I was in a real exercise slump. So my sister (who lives 2,300 miles away) and I agreed to do the Insanity workout “together.” We held each other accountable, talked each day about it, and even blogged about our experience. Nothing like this kind of accountability to keep you going. I’m still doing this workout when I need a real exercise-induced endorphin boost.

Or sign up for a series of classes — pay in full, in advance, and you’ll be more likely to follow through. 

The key? Be consistent, but not militant. Life happens. Plan to workout. Do you best to make it happen. If it doesn’t, start again tomorrow. Do it regularly and the habit of exercise will follow. And you’ll reap the immeasurable benefits.