let’s start designing.

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Today I launch a new vision for iLawPractice. The shift is a big one — away from a focus primarily on technology and to a focus on designing a holistic practice that accounts for all the needs that a person has: financial, emotional, intellectual, spiritual.

I started iLawPractice when other lawyers began asking me for help — specifically, how to identify and integrate the right technology to support their practices. And I really, really enjoyed it.

But what I’ve realized is that technology is but a small piece in the puzzle. What makes a law practice worth doing is a lot bigger than choosing a practice management platform or using templates to automate doc preparation.

My clients have consistently needed and wanted counsel on so much more than the tech. From day one, we’ve talked about communication, marketing strategy, emotional intelligence, client service. And so much more.

And I realized that helping other lawyers isn’t about the tech. It’s about helping them to design an inspired practice, whatever that means to them.

So today I’m launching a new website — itself an experiment in agility. I expect it to change a lot, possibly in a short period of time. But I start here.

And I invite any lawyer who seeks a change in his/her practice to join me in drawing a map, picking a path, and embarking on the journey of designing an inspired practice.

links i like.

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I’m consumed with workflow this week. So much so that the it’s inspired a transformation of the whole iLawPractice enterprise. More on that soon.

In the meantime, some links I like. About workflow and progress:

This post on A List Apart about prototyping workflows goes directly to issues we all have when trying to iterate and improve on our workflows.

One of my newest obsessions: Kanban. I’m a visual thinker and this simply rings lots of bells for me. I can see its application in so many areas apropos to the practice of law.

Turns out that progress is about ebb and flow. Not an orderly ascension. <Imagine this makes a few folks kind of uncomfortable.>

Effective workflow is a very personal thing. This guy spent a year trying different methods of productivity to tweak his workflow. Here are the 10 top things he learned.

Apparently the average working person spends 28% of the day dealing with email. Egads! Perhaps a more disciplined approach to email can help?

How, where, when you work — all part of the many choices we make. I like Seth’s advice.

How to get stuff done, and avoid burn out, in three steps.

And what to do if you’re already experiencing burn out. Sadly, I know many folks who should read this. Maybe they’re reading this post, too.